This page contains resources for learning more about Park Natures and Anime-Style Battling, which includes abilities, moves, and similar mechanics. These will help you role play your Pokemon and their battles in the Park!

Natures

Unlike in the games, natures will not alter your Pokemon’s stats. These are simply guidelines to help you roleplay your Pokemon’s personality in the Park. The way a Pokemon reacts to battles or other situations is dictated by their nature. Remember that Nature is not everything, as creativity/plot/etc can make exceptions for move selections and behavior.

You may freely decide Natures of the Pokemon you bring into the Park on that Pokemon’s first visit. Until a Pokemon is brought into the Park, that Pokemon’s nature may be changed at any time. After it’s been brought into the Park, though, it may not be changed. Pokemon obtained from the Park keep their Ranger-determined nature after they’ve been captured. This means that when you trade a Pokemon that has already visited the Park, or was captured in the Park, it retains its nature. A Pokemon’s Nature can only be changed after it’s been brought to or obtained in the Park by purchasing and using an Aprijuice.

  1. Adamant (Stubborn): This Pokémon is usually immune to persuasion because its set in its beliefs. It’ll be likely to ignore Encore, Taunt, Follow Me, Covet, Attract, Captivate, and moves of that sort. In fact, it might make this Pokémon more determined if someone uses those moves on it. If it does fall for one of those moves, it probably won’t admit it’s under an attack’s effect and will willingly let itself deeper into the affliction. It’s also likely to ignore the Trainer if the Pokémon feels the Trainer’s suggestion isn’t the best (this could be a possible penalty if the member’s post requires one). This Pokémon isn’t a good team player. It really hates using added moves except for BMs.
  2. Bashful (Silent and Reserved): This Pokémon will usually obey unless it feels bad for some reason. Either way, it won’t show emotions or complain. However, when disobeying, all this Pokémon will do is retreat or sit there and do nothing. It’s an excellent team player and nice for making combos. It might have preference when using its level up moves or added moves, but it won’t let a Trainer know what it is. Whether it prefers using one or the other is secretly randomized by the Ranger and the Trainer should just pay attention to the way the Pokémon behaves. This could make for a good bonus if the Trainer notices or a penalty if the Trainer doesn’t get it after a few tries.
  3. Bold (Show off): This Pokémon should be more prone to give everything it’s got, not being afraid of anything, and being risky/accident prone. It might also be likely to run towards incoming attacks to dodge at the last second and strike the opponent head on, so it will not be as likely to dodge. This kind of Pokémon should be a bit more creative when using dangerous surroundings because it has a need to show that it’s brave and daring. It doesn’t mind using its level up moves or BMs, but it loves using the added ones.
  4. Brave (Courageous): This Pokémon won’t be easily intimidated and won’t back away from a fight. However, it’s not necessarily daring. Just because it’s brave it doesn’t mean it’s dumb or accident prone. However, this Pokémon might have a bit of conflict when its partner or its Trainer cowers or if they don’t believe in this Pokémon’s capabilities. It doesn’t have preference when using its level up moves or added moves.
  5. Calm (Peaceful and Serene): This Pokémon prefers to dodge moves and attack, dodge and attack, and so on. It also pays attention to strike in a way were it would cause the most effect. Note that this Pokémon will ignore Taunt and is really likely to not fall under the effects of Outrage, Rage, Thrash, and Petal Dance. It’s a good team player and nice for making combos. This Pokémon doesn’t have preference when using its level up moves or added moves, although it prefers to not have to make direct contact.
  6. Careful (Cautious and Wise): This Pokémon likes to play it defensively and, if possible, wait out the battle. It’s a master of defensive moves, healing moves, or any move that hinders the target’s attack. It enjoys playing ninja with the surroundings. This Pokémon doesn’t like attacking the opponent unless it’s using moves to decrease the target’s power or moves to inflict a status condition. However, it won’t question using damaging moves once it feels safe enough to attack. This Pokémon really dislikes using added damaging moves, including BMs, but it has no problem with its own level up moves and added non-damaging moves.
  7. Docile (Silent and Obedient): This Pokémon would never disobey its Trainer and will try to please them even when its health won’t allow it. This Pokémon’s Trainer should be considerate and more aware of their Pokémon’s health as it may get itself KO’d while trying to obey. Rangers should be very strict on a Trainer using this Pokemon. Still, it is good for making complex combos. It doesn’t have preference when using its level up moves or added moves.
  8. Gentle (Peaceful and Kind): This Pokémon prefers to dodge moves and attack lightly, dodge, and attack lightly, and so on. It’s fully aware that the enemy Pokémon is meant to be captured, so it will try its best to not deliver a KO. Note that this Pokémon might ignore Taunt and has a slight chance of not falling under the effects of Outrage, Thrash, and Petal Dance due to its peaceful tendencies. It’s an excellent team player and nice for making combos. This Pokémon prefers weaker moves and may be hesitant to use a more powerful one.
  9. Hardy (Courageous and Daring): This Pokémon should be more prone to give everything it’s got and not be afraid of anything. It might also be likely to run towards incoming attacks to use those attacks to its advantage somehow, so it might be a bit less likely to dodge. It is probable that this kind of Pokémon will take charge in a tricky situation and show no fear. The actions it takes may work wonderfully or fail miserably due to its risk-taking. It doesn’t have preference when using its level up moves or added moves.
  10. Hasty (Impatient): This Pokémon prefers straightforward battling and will tend to act on its own if the Trainer commands more than one non-damaging move. It prefers to attack head-on rather than from the distance, and it’s very vengeful on anyone who either hurt it or delayed it. It’ll fall blindly for any Taunts but will ignore completely any Encore on a non-damaging move. This Pokémon does require to be praised by the Trainer for a job well done. It prefers to use level up moves and BMs. It has nothing against added moves, but having it do a level up move instead of an added one is a plausible penalty if one is needed.
  11. Impish (Mischievous): This Pokémon will get bored and ignore the Trainer if the commands tend to be too straightforward. This Pokémon likes to do really complex combos and loves doing tricky moves. It easily masters non-damaging moves other than Attract, Captivate, Encore, and Charm, and it won’t give its all when doing damaging moves unless it feels that it’s about to give the last blow. It loves the idea of placing the target in an embarrassing scenario. This member should get a good bonus for placing traps or making pranks; suggesting these to the Pokémon should also make it snap out of Taunt and Encore if well thought-out. It doesn’t have preference when using its level up moves or added moves but prefers non-damaging moves over damaging ones.
  12. Jolly (Happy and High Spirited): This Pokémon is very optimistic and seems to enjoy almost everything. It believes in itself and in others, so it’s a perfect team player. It is a master of charming moves (Attract, Captivate, Charm, Tickle, etc), and it’s hard to bring this Pokémon’s spirit down. However, this Pokémon might be really sensitive to what its own Trainer has to say. It doesn’t require cheering, but cheering for it wouldn’t hurt either. This Pokémon is likely to make friends with the wild Pokémon, even while in battle, so asking it to hurt a wild Pokemon too much might cause it to hesitate. This Pokémon tends to be very aware of others’ capabilities so it’s very unlikely for it to KO a wild Pokémon. It doesn’t have preference when using its level up moves or added moves.
  13. Lax (Lazy, Doesn’t feel anxiety or worry): This Pokémon isn’t good for making combos. It’ll probably just do the first attack it’s told if it thinks the combo is too complex for it. It’ll be very unlikely to fall for Encore, Taunt, Follow Me, Covet, Captivate, Attract and moves of that sort. Sleep moves will work well on this Pokémon. It won’t give its best all the time as it’s not that motivated. It’ll respond better if the Trainer offers a reward for a job well done. Be warned, this Pokémon is completely vengeful about having its rest and relaxation be disturbed. It’ll act viciously to whatever or whoever is responsible for disturbing it. It really hates to use added moves except for BMs.
  14. Lonely (Sad without companionship): This Pokémon requires support from its Trainer. It’s likely to do better if the Trainer cheers for it and to be careless if the Trainer remains silent. It should do great when teamed with another Pokémon and give its all when helped by a team move such as Helping Hand, Acupressure, Follow Me, etc. It should refuse to battle if it somehow feels betrayed by its partner or Trainer. It prefers using its level up moves rather than the added ones, but it will attempt one or two added moves in a battle.
  15. Mild (Peaceful and Easy-going): This Pokémon’s level of obedience is very good, although it will dramatically drop if the Trainer acts harshly in any way, including towards the opponent. It loves to get encouraged by the Trainer, but it tends to be afraid of hurting the target too bad. This Pokémon does perform combos excellently and is compatible to team with any other nature. It doesn’t have preference when using its level up moves or added moves.
  16. Modest (Humble and Moderate): This Pokémon will refuse to do Contest-Styled battling or show off in any way. It prefers everything simple and well-balanced. Because of that, this Pokemon does not need a lot of praise, since it’s fairly confident in its skills. In fact, too much praise might fluster or embarrass this Pokemon and make it mess up or refuse to act. It also doesn’t like people or Pokemon who boast too much and may attack them first if it has multiple options. It likes battles to have little to no tricks and to use mainly level up moves and BMs.
  17. Naive (Inexperienced and Trusting): This Pokémon is usually obedient, but it’s not so good at making combos. When commanded to do combos, it might skip the non-damaging moves or any move in the combo the Pokémon doesn’t really see the point in using. However, it’s perfect for two-on-two battles, as it’ll play along with whatever its partner starts. Also, this Pokémon will hardly ever fall for Taunt, Covet, Attract, Encore, Charm, Captivate, Fake Tears, and moves of the sort, as it doesn’t understand them. On top of that, even when sick or tired, this Pokémon will give it its best shot as it’ll still expect its moves to be at full power—a Trainer should watch out for this. This Pokémon requires lots of encouragement and coaching from its Trainer because at times it might even forget it’s in a battle or will allow the opponent to get too close as it tends not to expect attacks. It uses BMs and level up moves best, but it doesn’t have preference when using its level up moves or other added moves.
  18. Naughty (Badly Behaved and Mildly Indecent): This Pokémon will be prone to disobey the Trainer (as a penalty) or it will aim at the target’s face, behind, and possibly at the target’s mouth if it’s opened. The Trainer could get creative by treating this Pokémon as a child and/or using reverse psychology on it, since asking it to do nicer things might not go over well. A Trainer also has to watch out for it being too mean to others. This Pokémon might be hard to deal with, so Rangers should go easy on a Trainer using one. It doesn’t have preference when using its level up moves or added moves.
  19. Quiet (Silent and Shy): This Pokémon won’t dare show off, and it doesn’t do combos at all. It prefers to attack from the distance, but it won’t panic when facing an incoming Pokémon. Instead, it’ll flinch, use Teleport, use a move that’s altered if the user is attacked (Counter, Destiny Bond, Avalanche, etc.), or on rare occasions it might use Roar or Whirlwind. The Trainer must keep this Pokémon on its toes to keep that from happening. One thing to note about Quiet Pokémon is that they are always paying attention to everything and are really focused during the battle. They will study the opposing Pokémon and tend to always aim at whatever seems to be the Pokémon’s weak spot (“It’s always the quiet ones”). Still, when attacking from the distance, this Pokémon is extremely cautious and is very likely to dodge most attacks. It does not like company, but it won’t complain about it either. It doesn’t enjoy using added moves, including BMs.
  20. Quirky (Eccentric, Original, and Unpredictable): This Pokémon loves using moves such as Metronome, Sleep Talk, and Assist. It’s very dedicated when it comes to using moves that have no STAB bonus. It’ll always try do something odd when attacking, usually involving the weather and the surroundings; something that a normal Pokémon wouldn’t do in a battle. But make no mistake, this Pokémon is fully aware of what’s going on, usually, and is likely to dodge incoming attacks. The enemy Pokémon is often caught off-guard by this Pokémon’s weird ways. This Pokémon prefers to use added moves, including BMs, and dislikes using level up moves.
  21. Relaxed (Does not feel anxiety or worry): This Pokémon isn’t good for making complex combos. It’ll probably just do the first attack it’s told if it thinks the combo is too complex for it. It’ll be very unlikely to fall for Encore, Taunt, Follow Me, Covet, Captivate and moves of that sort (except maybe Attract). It will also be likely to ignore Worry Seed, and it’s pretty rare to see this type of Pokemon fretting about anything. The Pokémon will ignore the Trainer if the Trainer puts too much pressure on it. It doesn’t have preference when using its level up moves or added moves.
  22. Rash (Impulsive and Reckless): This Pokémon prefers straightforward battling and will act on its own if the Trainer commands a non-damaging move. It prefers to attack head-on rather than from the distance, and it’s very determined to knock out its target. The Trainer must be firm with this Pokémon as they won’t get a chance to capture the target Pokémon if it does get KO’d. This type of Pokemon will fall blindly for any Taunts, since it’s basically self-taunted to begin with, but will ignore completely any Encore on a non-damaging move. This Pokémon does not require cheering or praises of any kind. It prefers to use level up moves and BMs. It has nothing against added moves, but having it do a level up move instead of an added one is a plausible penalty if one is needed.
  23. Sassy (Lively, Stylish, and Disrespectful): This Pokémon just loves to strut, and it demands Contest-Styled battling. It craves attention and is a master of moves like Fake Tears, Charm, Attract, and Captivate. If this Pokémon doesn’t think the Trainer is helping it to show off while battling, it might just stand there and strike a pose. Still, wild Pokémon are likely to become puzzled and get caught completely off-guard when facing a Pokémon like this one. It’s a bad team player unless the partner helps to make this Pokemon look better, but it’s excellent for making complex combos. This Pokemon has no preference when using its level up moves or added moves.
  24. Serious (Dedicated, Humorless): This Pokémon will always obey if the Trainer acts serious as well. With this Pokémon, it’s better for it and the Trainer to be on the same page at all times as it might become puzzled if the Trainer suggests something it doesn’t expect. This Pokémon doesn’t like overdoing anything, but it will always give its best. Since this Pokémon is completely self-aware, it won’t try to do anything it can’t do, and it will become mad if the Trainer insists on something it doesn’t want to do. This Pokémon is likely to ignore Attract, Captivate, Charm, and Encore, as well as being likely to ignore the secondary effects of Outrage, Thrash, and Petal Dance. Its ability to be a team player depends on how compatible it is with the partner’s personality. It doesn’t have a preference when it comes to added moves or level up moves.
  25. Timid (Shy): This Pokémon won’t dare show off and it doesn’t do combos at all. It prefers to attack from the distance. If a wild Pokemon gets too close, this Pokemon will probably panic and attack the incoming Pokémon with more force than if the target were further away. However, this Pokémon is extremely cautious and very likely to dodge most attacks. Since this Pokémon doesn’t like battling much, it’ll perform moves that will get it outside of battle (Baton Pass, Explosion/Self-destruct, Memento, U-turn, etc) better than any other moves. It’s a plausible penalty for this Pokémon to use moves like those if it gets too scared. This Pokémon does not like company and won’t do well when partnered. It doesn’t enjoy using added moves, including BMs.

Anime Realism

Battling in the Park isn’t bound to the same rules of the game! You’re free to be as creative as you wish with how you use and combine moves. When thinking about how to respond to an attack or a Pokemon, consider a few things:

Remember: feel free to take risks when you’re being creative! Not only does creative choices in the Park boost your quality, but it also keeps the run entertaining for your Ranger!

These are some fun facts that are not applied in the video games, but that both Rangers and Trainers must be aware of, as they will apply to the National Park:

Hidden Machines (HMs):

HMs work the same as they do in the games for the most part. They are useful for easily navigating obstacles and terrain. Thematically, though, many HMs (and other moves) are also things that Pokemon can also realistically already do thanks to their typing anatomy. However, here are a few things to be aware of when using them or trying to do similar actions without them:

Note that, as with all things in the Park, the consequences/effectiveness of the above actions can always change! Consistently high quality may let you get by without an HM for longer, while consistently low quality may lessen the effects of an HM.

Status Conditions

A Ranger determines if a status is inflicted with the same parameters as damage, ie, quality and creativeness.

Having More Than One Major Status Condition:

A Pokémon can be confused and attracted at the same time, but they can also have two major status conditions (Sleep, Burn, Freeze, Poison/Toxic, Paralyze) at the same time, on top of confusion and attraction. The Trainer’s efforts will determine if two major conditions exist on any given Pokemon at any given time. Note that Toxic will overwrite poison so it will still be one condition.

Pokemon Abilities

These are the Pokemon Abilities that are slightly modified for anime style. If the Ability isn’t listed, it works like in game.

Adaptability – Moves matching the this Pokemon’s type will be more powerful and better performed.

Analytic – This Pokemon is cautious and tends to let the foe attack first so it can plan its own attacks more efficiently.

Anger Point – When hit on a weak spot, Pokemon will become angry and strike with greater force than normal.

Anticipation – This Pokemon can feel danger coming its way.

Battle Armor – This Pokemon’s armor decreases damage and has no weak spots.

Cheek Pouch – This Pokemon restores 5% HP if an Apricorn is successfully found (only when out of ball).

Color Change – This Pokemon is able to become invisible except for any markings the Pokemon has.

Compoundeyes – This Pokemon’s sight is a lot better than that of other Pokemon, even during the night, giving this Pokemon enhanced accuracy.

Dry Skin – This Pokemon is refreshed by rain and water, but it can’t stand heat or strong sunlight.

Forewarn – The Pokemon may sense what might happen next.

Friend Guard – This Pokemon cares more for its allies than itself, so in during battle it will guard them to reduce the amount of damage they take.

Frisk – This Pokemon will be very attentive to detail and has an extra chance to find an Apricorn after a battle.

Gluttony – This Pokemon will eat anything edible, and if it finds Berries, will eat them at 75% health. When it sees or smells food, this Pokemon will do anything it can to reach it.

Grass Pelt – This Pokemon can blend into grassy areas.

Guts – This Pokemon will fight harder when suffering from a status condition.

Harvest – This Pokemon raises the rate of finding an Apricorn to 25% after a battle.

Healer – This Pokemon hates seeing teammates suffer, so in battle it may attempt to heal the status conditions of its allies.

Honey Gather – The Pokemon might be able to find Honey when out of the Pokeball. (Only 3 times per Park visit. 50% rate)

Intimidate – This Pokemon’s behavior or appearance may cause opponents to hesitate to attack.

Klutz – This Pokemon is extremely accident-prone and uncoordinated. It has a big problem with even simple combos, and may often trip and/or fall.

Magician – This Pokemon has a knack for finding Apricorns on the ground. (Three times per visit. 25% rate)

Moxie – This Pokemon is not likely to be discouraged.

Mummy – This Pokemon wraps foes who Physically attack it in bandages that change the attacker’s Ability to Mummy.

No Guard – This Pokemon will always battle as close to the opponent as possible to maximize accuracy and even be able to strike through Protect and Detect from time to time. (Certain Pokemon may not apply this Ability due to their nature)

Pickup – This Pokemon has a knack for finding Apricorns on the ground. (Three times per visit. 25% rate)

Pressure – The enemy Pokemon must put out a bit more effort when striking this Pokemon and makes it hard to use the same move more than once per battle.

Reckless – Pokemon will try to hit hard regardless of the consequences.

Rivalry – The Pokemon will try its best to get rid of other Pokemon of the same gender, but it will be shy when facing Pokemon of the opposite gender.

Run Away – This Pokemon grants an extra 10% chance to successfully run from an encounter .

Shell Armor – This Pokemon’s armor decreases damage and has no weak spots.

Shield Dust – This Pokemon creates dust when being attacked that slightly reduces the power of incoming attacks and negates added effects.

Sniper – This Pokemon always tries to inspect the target for weak spots and attempts to hit them harder than usual.

Solid Rock – This Pokemon’s body is very hard, decreasing the damage of super-effective moves by 25% and also slightly lowering the damage of all other moves.

Stench – This Pokemon’s odor will bother all Pokemon who can smell it or who aren’t used to that smell. Useful during battle, but it will also repel wild Pokemon.

Sticky Hold – This Pokemon’s grip is extremely hard to break, no matter what it is holding.

Suction Cups – This Pokemon has suction cups which it may use to hang on to anything, including the ground.

Symbiosis – This Pokemon is naturally friendly and helpful toward all Pokemon.

Truant – This Pokemon’s Nature becomes Lax as long as it has this Ability.

Unburden – When this Pokemon uses a healing move, its speed raises.

Unnerve – This Pokemon makes its foes uneasy.

Wonder Guard – This Pokemon takes only a very small amount of damage from any move that is not super-effective, but super-effective moves will knock it out in one hit.

 

Anime-Style Moves

Here are some moves that are different in the anime than in the video games:

Aromatherapy: Only Pokemon that are near the user will be affected by this move. Those affected will have their status restored, and they will get a small energy boost. The energy boost is just a burst of energy; it does not restore HP.

Assist: The user randomly uses a move known by one of the other Pokemon brought into the Park by the Trainer.

Astonish: It’s not a Physical move and it doesn’t require contact. The user just shouts in a frightening ghostly way while its face just morphs, stretches, darkens, and overall it becomes so scary the opponent flinches.

Attract: This condition remains on the targeted Pokemon, regardless of post quality, until the user or the affected Pokemon leave battle.

Barrier: Creates an invisible wall that shields the user. However, the wall will remain in place, so it doesn’t protect the user if the attack goes around the wall or if the user moves from behind the wall’s protection. The wall doesn’t disappear until the user faints though.

Confuse Ray: It travels within a second to nearby targets when on land. However, when underwater, it slowly spreads through the water like ink. It still does confuse with very high accuracy.

Confusion: The Pokemon uses its psychic power to lift the opponent into the air and move it around at will. This grip doesn’t last forever, but it may cause the opponent to become confused once it ends.

Counter: It’s type equals that of the attack being reflected.

Destiny Bond: This move’s effects fade away at the end of the second post it was used in. If a wild Pokemon uses this move, it will fade away at the end of the Ranger’s second post. If a Trainer’s Pokemon uses it, it will fade away at the end of the Trainer’s second post.

Detect: It doesn’t create a barrier. The Pokemon just senses the opponent’s attack and dodges it.

Disable: The opponent becomes unable to move as long as the user is able to focus enough to maintain this attack.

Double Team: The user creates copies of itself. These copies can either be simple illusions or they can be like clones which can also move and attack. Creating the ones who can attack, however, will also drain a lot of energy from the user.

Dragon Rage: It’s actually a Dragon-type Flamethrower that doesn’t always deliver 40 points of damage

Fire Spin: The user creates a fire twister to trap the target in it. If successful, even though its base power is 15, it’ll do continuous damage so it can strike as a Flamethrower or even better depending on how it was performed.

Fissure: In the National Park, Fissure is not a one-hit-kill move—it’s just a really strong Earthquake. It’s also particularly effective in changing the landscape. Be careful, as damaging the Park too much can get a Trainer in trouble.

Focus Punch: The user’s fists begin to glow, but the user doesn’t wait for the target to make a move. The user just charges towards the opponent to strike. The move fails if the user gets hit before it can strike.

Future Sight: In the user’s second post, the user can avoid an attack, counter an attack, or launch an offensive attack. Depending on the user’s post quality, two or three of these actions can be performed.

Glare: The user’s eyes begin to glow yellow as it stares at the target. It inflicts the paralysis status condition on the target only for as long as the user keeps staring and is able to focus this attack.

Guillotine: The Guillotine takes on the form of a large, white, slashing light emanated by the Pokemon’s claw. It doesn’t cause a Pokemon to faint instantly; it’s more like a very strong Slash.

Hail: It can either summon snow storms or hail storms. Either one will activate abilities that activate during Hail.

Happy Hour: Can be used when taking a picture to double that picture’s value. Can only be used once per run.

Haze: The user creates a cold, dark smokescreen. It will still remove all stat modifications.

Heal Bell: It requires the user to be near the target(s). It’ll heal scars, status conditions, and a bit of health. In addition to that, it soothes those who can hear it.

Hidden Power: This move’s type is randomly rolled for use in the Park. If the Pokemon is caught, the Trainer must have its type rolled by an Official or Moderator.

Horn Drill: It’s obviously stronger than a Horn Attack, but doesn’t knock out the target in one hit even if it connects.

Ice Fang: The user can shoot ice rays out of its fangs that doesn’t require contact at all. Conversely, this can also be used as an icy biting attack.

Light Screen: It does create a protective barrier for special moves, but the barrier vanishes as soon as the user performs another move. Alternatively, this move can also create five panels that wear out over time.

Magical Leaf: The user fires colorful leaves at the target. These leaves will go wherever the user wants them to—until they hit something or until the user becomes unable to focus on them; whichever comes first.

Meditate: While it does increase attack power, the Pokemon also levitates while using this move.

Mimic: This move randomly copies one of the wild Pokemon’s moves and keeps it until the user is recalled or the battle ends.

Mirror Coat: It’s type equals that of the attack being reflected.

Mirror Move: The user copies the last move used against it, even if the attack didn’t hit.

Perish Song: This doesn’t knock out every Pokemon on the field in 3 turns. The song just delivers heavy damage and a lot of pain to the performer and any Pokemon who hears it. It requires for the user to keep singing if the Trainer wants both Pokemon to faint. If the user stops singing, the song’s effect stops.

Petal Dance: It can be used once without the user throwing a tantrum. The problem may come if the user is told to use it more than once.

Protect: While Protect does work just like in the games, it doesn’t prevent the opponent from receiving recoil damage from their own moves.

Psychic: The Pokemon uses its psychic power to lift the opponent into the air and move it around at will. This grip doesn’t last forever, but it lasts longer than Confusion, and it may cause the opponent to become more sensitive to special attacks.

Psywave: The user creates a ring of psychic energy and shoots it at the target. The power of this move is still random.

Reflect: It does create a protective barrier for physical moves, but the barrier vanishes as soon as the user performs another move. Alternatively, this move can also create five panels that wear out over time.

Rest: The Pokemon goes to sleep, but its Health remains the same while it sleeps. The opponent must try to do as much damage as needed to the sleeping Pokemon because once the user wakes up, it’ll be a full Health.

Roar: The Pokemon lets out a loud bellow that can startle a foe and interrupt a move. This does not automatically scare away a wild Pokemon.

Rock Tomb: Rocks come out of the ground and hold the target in place.

Rototiller: After a battle, a Pokemon can use this to have an extra chance at finding an Apricorn.

Sandstorm: It can summon sandstorms, but it can also be used as a Ground-type Twister which won’t alter the weather.

Sand Tomb: The user spins around on the ground creating a swirling sand pit trap. The user remains in the center/bottom of the sand pit. Any Pokemon caught in this trap will slowly sink into it while being dragged towards the user Pokemon.

Safeguard: The user creates a force field that weakens attacks slightly, eliminating any possible status condition they may inflict. Physical items cannot get into the Safeguard (such as natural falling rocks), but a Pokemon might be able to enter it with a well-performed attack. Safeguard does require for the user focus on it a bit, but it still allows the user to multitask.

Secret Power: While this move’s power and effects are still the same in anime style, this move can be used as a physical move and make contact or as a special move and not make contact at all. It all depends on how the trainer describes the way Secret Power is being performed.

Shadow Punch: The user punches at the target from a distance. Shadow fists will be shot out of the user’s punches to try to strike the target.

Sonicboom: It doesn’t always do 40 points of damage. Its damage and uses depends on how the Pokemon performs it. It can be a strong move, but, it all depends on the Trainer’s quality and the Ranger’s judgment.

Spikes: The user shoots spikes all around. They may hurt any Pokemon that steps on them, no matter which team they are from or how they stepped on the spikes.

Spite: The user becomes spiteful towards the target and makes it harder for it to perform the last move it used.

Sweet Kiss: The user creates pink hearts that will confuse anyone who touches them.

Tail Whip: In addition to possibly dropping the target’s defense, it acts like a whip, so it will do a bit of damage.

Teeter Dance: The user dances a misbalanced Hawaiian Hula Dance. Everyone around will be forced to dance in the same way, including the Trainer if they or the Pokemon weren’t careful.

Teleport: It doesn’t necessarily teleport the user and its Trainer away from battle. The Pokemon can just use it to dodge or teleport to a more strategic spot.

Toxic Spikes: Judging from how Spikes work, these spikes shot by the user may hurt any Pokemon that steps on them, including poisoning them, no matter which team they are from or how they stepped on the spikes.

Transform: In addition to how Transform works in the video games, the user may also choose to transform into anything it sees, including plants, items, humans, etc. Also, a Pokemon may use Transform even if the Pokemon it transformed into doesn’t know that move.

Whirlwind: This move can be used as a Flying-type Twister. It does not automatically scare away a wild Pokemon.

Yawn: The user spits out a big, slow-moving, pink bubble that puts anyone to sleep on contact.

Zen Headbutt: The user attempts a headbutt that shoots out psychic waves. These waves may flinch the target before Zen Headbutt strikes and not after.

 

Last edited by K'sariya on 1 December 2017