Welcome to the Art Section!

The URPG is finally embracing the old adage, “A picture is worth one thousand words.” So instead of writing or roleplaying for your Pokemon, come and draw us one instead!

Special thanks to the following for their huge help in making the decisions involved in setting up this section and adding information: Kai-Mei, FrozenChaos, EmBreon, Alaskapigeon, Gun6, and WinterVines. 


List of Curators

Head Curator
WinterVines

Expert Curators
EmBreon
K’sariya

Active Curators
Elrond 2.0
juliorain
Morru Magnum
Sou Cleife
VeloJello
Inactive Curators
Alaskapigeon
Axion
Dalek
Elamite
FrozenChaos
Nitro
Speed-X
TheProtobabe
Zoned

Basic Art Requirements

Score

Since art is unique and every piece is different, our Art section uses a points-based system to determine successful captures. Each piece of art you submit will be given a score out of 100 by one of our Art Curators, based on a variety of subjective factors. Each Pokemon is put into a tier, which has differnet point requirements:

Make sense? For a Magikarp, one piece scoring 25 points will get you that floppy fish. For a Porygon-Z, you’re going to have to pull out an amazing 95 point piece, which will probably require direct ancestry from Leonardo Da Vinci.

Captures

All art has one “target” Pokemon that an artist hopes to succesfully capture, which should be noted somewhere on the work. Currently, each piece may only target one Pokemon regardless of how many other Pokemon are in that artwork.

Keep in mind that even though Alolan forms of Pokemon are the same rank, the Pokemon themselves are not interchangeable. If you are seeking an Alolan mon, then you must depict that variant in your work.

If an artist scores high enough with their piece, they can claim their target Pokemon. However, it is also possible to draw an evolved Pokemon and aim to capture a lower evolution stage too. For example, if Porygon-Z falls a little short of the required 95 score, it may score high enough for a lower evolution rank, like Porygon for 75, in which case an artist can aim for the basic Pokemon instead.

 

Cash

If an artist doesn’t want to capture a Pokemon to add to their stats, they can opt to draw for cash instead and receive a money value instead of a Pokemon. These pieces are determined by quality and don’t necessarily need to feature a specific target Pokemon. However, Fakemon (Pokemon that are made up) are not currently eligible for submission. A Curator still scores them as normal, and a user will receive funds assigned to the rank the score falls under.

Proving Your Work

We expect to see some form of “proof of work” in every piece. For drawings and painting, this is can be as simple as a signature. The same applies to photoshop-based work such as banners. For photographed work, sign a piece of paper to be included in the photo. You get the idea. This signature should probably be your forum name (or your real one, if you’re comfortable with that) just for clarity and to make sure the art isn’t being taken from another artist. The internet has plenty of ways for us to detect plagiarism, so don’t.


Types of Art and How We Score It

We’re open to pretty much any art form you can think of: Drawing, Painting, Sculpting, Modeling, and the wide variety of computer-based art such as 3D Models, Banners, Sprites and Animation.

However, this obviously means we can’t use a standard criteria to score every piece of submitted art. We have decided not to make distinct categories, as it effectively isn’t a competition. Curators will give your piece a score, and provide a list of reasons why you received or lost points, which will vary depending on the art form. This reasoning is intended to help you improve your current or future pieces of work.

Below is some general advice on what Curators look for in each of the art forms, to help maximize your score.

Drawing
To obtain the highest amount of points with these techniques, we would need to see at least half of the desired Pokemon if it is the main focal point, if not, it needs to be completely visible. A clear light source, or sources should you have more than one, should be included along with shadows. You should also use various line thickness and shading techniques to give your artwork depth and dimension. If you’re drawing with a pencil, don’t smudge the lead. This is smudging, not shading. If this is the effect you want, use a tortillon or tissue/toilet paper. Color is not needed; however, if you decide to use color, it needs to be used in the shading as well.

Painting
As with drawn art, paintings also need a light source, shadows, and shading. The paint needs to be smooth along the contours of what is being painted. If only one colour is selected, a minimum of three shades/tints of that colour is required. There should be little to no white spaces and the transition while blending should be near impossible to tell.

Graphics
Banners and other collages of images fall into this category. As elements of this style come from stock photos and other non-artist-created aspects, emphasis is placed on composition of the piece as a whole, including filters, added designs, color, and other effects applied to the artwork. Form elements like the Pokemon anatomy are rarely applicable here, since stock photos may not be original work. This type of art is scored a little harder due to this.

Modeling
Clay, Papercraft, 3D modeling, and other physical forms fall under this category. Anatomy is important, and adding extra details improves quality. If clay, paint or glaze can enhance features, and paper-folding can have other mediums of art added to it. But the Pokemon should not be the only aspect of the piece. Environment is also considered in the score. If the artwork is physical, create a background for the Pokemon, such as a diorama or things from outside, like grass and rocks. Modeling on the computer should follow these same guidelines and create both Pokemon and environment.

Abstract
Abstract art that represents a Pokemon would have to go by ALL of that Pokemon’s colour scheme. It would also have to be in the style of another abstract artist. At least five of the seven elements of art would have to be depicted and directly correspond to the desired Pokemon. For example, shape. A Charmander would be a bunch of curves and circles, NOT a bunch of corners and squares. This is the hardest form of art to grade, and will therefore be graded the hardest.


Useful Elements for Artists

Beyond the specific medium requirements, here are some general tips/things to keep in mind when creating art.

Form
This includes not only Pokemon anatomy but shapes and lines in general. A line can portray many things depending on the way it is drawn. Are the lines clear? Do they take the correct shape? Pay attention to how the object looks as a whole, in relation to other lines. Is the anatomy of the Pokemon correct? Of course, some things may be changed due to style, but the main pieces should still be there. Does anything look off? Did you forget a wing segment or attach a limb in the wrong place? This can skew the entire look of the image, so be careful.

Details
Little things can sometimes make an image. Pay close attention to things like fur, scales, other textures, background objects, and other small things that are easy to overlook. They may not seem too important, but putting in those tiny touches not only improves quality but also shows viewers that the artist put time and effort into the piece.

Space
Sometimes its good to make use of negative space in order to portray a theme, but make sure the image doesn’t look empty either. Too much white or blank areas gives a feel that the image is not finished, and that will lose points. If the Pokemon doesn’t take up the entire page, think about trimming edges until the image has a better look. How close or far are objects in the piece? Things can overlap to add depth, and size of objects helps develop spatial relationships between them.

Light
Keep in mind which direction the light is coming from. A helpful technique told by art teachers is to draw a tiny sun in one corner with an arrow that can be removed later, just to keep in mind where shadows should be. If an object blocks out light on one side, there is probably shadow on the other side. There are also usually shadows underneath things or darker shades on things farther away, depending on where the light is. Shadows make a piece seem more realistic and less flat.

Color
Color doesn’t have to be used, but when it is, colors follow similar rules to light and should have shadows. Color can make objects and Pokemon easier to distinguish, so make sure to match the colors as best as you can. Color is also helpful in portraying mood and tone, too, such as red meaning anger, power, or love. Different values of the same color should also be used, especially with shadows or distance. Try to blend colors together smoothly to avoid an abrupt change with a noticeable line.

Balance
Is the piece balanced? Every piece of work has a type of “weight” assigned to it. If the piece was hung on the wall, would it lean to one side or the other? Try to distribute that art weight evenly across the piece, as it can make the art seem off otherwise. This also helps an artist fill up the canvas and avoid too much empty space.

Perspective
Perspective refers to the angle of the image. Do viewers look straight at the Pokemon with a flat background? Are they following the view of a Pokeball swinging in for the capture? Depending on the lens an artist gives a piece of art, the dynamic, or exciting factor, is increased. While looking at a Pokemon just sitting in a field may fulfill basic requirements, it’s not always very interesting. Think creatively when figuring out where to position objects. Having a camera angle looking down usually displays things like power, while looking up at something reveals meekness.

Unity
This is probably the most important thing to consider when making art. Does everything fit together? This goes beyond just plopping things down on the canvas. Everything must seem like it belongs in the artwork. It’s very easy to tell when something is forced, filler, and just doesn’t belong with the rest of the piece. Try to keep everything in a similar style, with shading, themes, and other principles. At the end of the day, the piece should stand strong as a whole, not just with great individual portions. This especially applies to background; a piece isnt’ really “complete” if it’s just a Pokemon floating in white space.


Extra Art Events

Here are some bonus things that the Art Section often does, if you’re looking for some variety or some other purpose for making art.

Contests
Every once in a while, URPG will hold some sort of art contest. In the past, these have mostly been Banner Contests for threads missing them, but the more artists available, the more interesting things we can do. Have an idea? Share it with a Curator!

Monthly Prompts
Need a little inspiration to begin? Every month, there is a themed challenge where artists can follow prompts to earn extra cash. It doesn’t even matter if the artwork passes or fails! So long as you fit the theme properly, you are rewarded. These prompts can be color, a specific setting, type of Pokemon, or abstract idea. There are usually a couple to choose from if one of them leaves you stumped.

Art Deals
Don’t want any more Pokemon but still want to make art? You can always set up an art deal. Other members are constantly looking for specific Pokemon that might not be easy to get themselves. That’s where you come in. By capturing a Pokemon through art for them, you can then set up a trade for a different Pokemon or a TM Case of appropriate value.


Art for Cash

If a user doesn’t want to draw to capture a Pokemon, they have another option in making art for cash instead. The process is the same as normal. A member submits a piece of art, a Curator evaluates it, and then, depending on which rank it passes under, the artist them claims cash as their prize instead of a Pokemon.

How It Works:

Money Values Earned (by Rank):

Extras:


List of Pokemon by Tier

Easiest (25+)

Magikarp, Caterpie, Ledyba, Spinarak, Sunkern, Unown, Wurmple, Wynaut, Kricketot, Burmy, Sewaddle, Scatterbug

Simple (35+)

Weedle, Pidgey, Rattata, Metapod, Spearow, Ekans, Sandshrew, Zubat, Oddish, Paras, Diglett, Poliwag, Bellsprout, Geodude, Machop, Mankey, Goldeen, Tentacool

Hoothoot, Sentret, Mareep, Hoppip, Wooper, Pineco, Slugma, Pichu, Magby, Elekid, Smoochum, Cleffa, Igglybuff

Wingull, Poochyena, Zigzagoon, Cascoon, Silcoon,Taillow, Surskit, Slakoth, Nincada, Whismur, Azurill, Skitty, Spoink, Cacnea, Barboach, Spheal

Bidoof, Budew, Shinx, Cherubi, Mantyke, Combee, Shellos, Chingling, Bonsly

Patrat, Lillipup, Purrloin, Pansage, Pansear, Panpour, Pidove, Roggenrola, Woobat

Spewpa

Pikipek, Yungoos, Grubbin, Cutiefly, Fomantis, Bounsweet, Morelull

Medium (45+)

Kakuna, Pikachu, Nidoran (F), Nidoran (M), Clefairy, Vulpix, Jigglypuff, Venonat, Meowth, Psyduck, Growlithe, Magnemite, Doduo, Seel, Grimer, Shellder, Krabby, Voltorb, Exeggcute, Cubone, Koffing, Gloom, Drowzee

Furret, Ledian, Ariados, Chinchou, Natu, Yanma, Snubbull, Teddiursa, Swinub, Corsola, Remoraid, Houndour, Phanpy, Tyrouge, Skiploom, Marill, Sudowoodo, Sunflora, Wobbuffet, Dunsparce, Delibird, Stantler

Lotad, Seedot, Shroomish, Gulpin, Plusle, Minun, Illumise, Numel, Aron, Makuhita, Duskull, Carvanha, Wailmer, Spinda, Trapinch, Shuppet, Snorunt, Roselia, Corphish, Baltoy, Castform, Sealeo, Clamperl, Luvdisc

Starly, Kricketune, Wormadam, Mothim, Pachirisu, Buizel, Glameow, Stunky, Bronzor, Mime Jr., Croagunk, Snover, Finneon

Munna, Blitzle, Timburr, Tympole, Swadloon, Venipede, Petilil, Sandile, Maractus, Dwebble, Scraggy, Trubbish, Gothita, Solosis, Ducklett, Vanillite, Deerling, Emolga, Karrablast, Foongus, Joltik, Klink, Elgyem, Cubchoo, Shelmet, Stunfisk

Bunnelby, Fletchling, Litleo, Flabébé, Pancham, Espurr, Spritzee, Swirlix, Binacle, Helioptile, Dedenne, Carbink, Phantump, Pumpkaboo, Bergmite

Charjabug, Crabrawler, Rockruff, Dewpider, Stufful, Steenee, Togedemaru
Hard (55+)

Bulbasaur, Charmander, Squirtle, Butterfree, Pidgeotto, Raticate, Fearow, Arbok, Sandslash, Nidorina, Nidorino, Golbat, Parasect, Primeape, Poliwhirl, Machoke, Weepinbell, Tentacruel, Graveler, Ponyta, Slowpoke, Onix, Eevee, Seaking, Exeggutor, Lickitung, Rhyhorn, Tangela, Horsea, Staryu, Mr. Mime, Farfetch’d, Omanyte, Kabuto

Chikorita, Cyndaquil, Totodile, Noctowl, Togepi, Flaafy, Azumarill, Aipom, Quagsire, Murkrow, Misdreavus, Girafarig, Forretress, Gligar, Qwilfish, Sunflora, Miltank, Shuckle, Sneasel, Magcargo, Octillery, Mantine, Smeargle

Treecko, Torchic, Mudkip, Beautifly, Dustox, Mightyena, Linoone, Lombre, Nuzleaf, Swellow, Ralts, Masquerain, Vigoroth, Loudred, Ninjask, Shedinja, Pelipper, Lairon, Nosepass, Sableye, Mawile, Meditite, Electrike, Volbeat, Swalot, Grumpig, Vibrava, Cacturne, Swablu, Zangoose, Seviper, Lunatone, Solrock, Torkoal, Whiscash, Lileep, Anorith, Tropius, Chimecho, Relicanth

Turtwig, Chimchar, Piplup, Staravia, Luxio, Cherrim, Bibarel, Vespiqueen, Gastrodon, Drifloon, Buneary, Purugly, Skuntank, Chatot, Hippopotas, Skorupi, Toxicroak, Carnivine, Lumineon, Cranidos, Shieldon

Snivy, Tepig, Oshawott, Watchog, Herdier, Liepard, Simisage, Simisear, Simipour, Tranquill, Boldore, Swoobat, Audino, Gurdurr, Palpitoad, Whirlipede, Cottonee, Basculin, Krokorok, Darumaka, Yamask, Minccino, Gothorita, Duosion, Swanna, Vanillish, Escavalier, Amoonguss, Frillish, Alomomola, Ferroseed, Klang, Tynamo, Accelgor, Mienfoo, Golett, Rufflet, Vullaby, Tirtouga, Archen, Heatmor

Chespin, Fennekin, Froakie, Fletchinder, Vivillon, Floette, Skiddo, Furfrou, Meowstic, Inkay, Skrelp, Clauncher, Tyrunt, Amaura, Hawlucha, Klefki, Noibat

Rowlet, Litten, Popplio, Trumbeak, Gumshoos, Shiinotic, Oricorio, Wishiwashi, Mudbray, Salandit, Wimpod, Sandygast, Pyukumuku, Bruxish

Complex (65+)

Ivysaur, Charmeleon, Wartortle, Beedrill, Clefable, Ninetales, Wigglytuff, Vileplume, Venomoth, Dugtrio, Persian, Golduck, Arcanine, Abra, Victreebel, Golem, Rapidash, Magneton, Dodrio, Dewgong, Muk, Cloyster, Gastly, Hypno, Kingler, Electrode, Marowak, Hitmonlee, Hitmonchan, Weezing, Rhydon, Seadra, Jynx, Electabuzz, Magmar, Pinsir, Tauros, Gyarados, Lapras, Ditto, Dratini

Piloswine, Xatu, Donphan, Skarmory, Ursaring, Granbull, Houndoom, Hitmontop, Bellossom, Bayleef, Croconaw, Quilava, Jumpluff, Lanturn, Heracross, Larvitar, Togetic

Combusken, Grovyle, Marshtomp, Manectric, Ludicolo, Shiftry, Kirlia, Breloom, Delcatty, Dusclops, Sharpedo, Medicham, Wailord, Camerupt, Banette, Crawdaunt, Feebas, Walrein, Huntail, Gorebyss, Glalie, Hariyama, Kecleon, Bagon, Altaria, Claydol, Beldum

Grotle, Monferno, Prinplup, Roserade, Floatzel, Ambipom, Drifblim, Lopunny, Bronzong, Happiny, Gible, Hippowdon, Drapion, Abomasnow, Froslass, Mismagius, Weavile, Spiritomb, Yanmega, Phione

Servine, Pignite, Dewott, Stoutland, Musharna, Zebstrika, Drilbur, Throh, Sawk, Leavanny, Whimsicott, Lilligant, Darmanitan, Crustle, Scrafty, Cofagrigus, Garbodor, Zorua, Cinccino, Sawsbuck, Jellicent, Galvantula, Eelektrik, Beheeyem, Litwick, Axew, Beartic, Cryogonal, Druddigon, Pawniard, Bouffalant, Durant, Deino, Sigilyph

Quilladin, Braixen, Frogadier, Diggersby, Pyroar, Gogoat, Pangoro, Aromatisse, Slurpuff, Malamar, Barbaracle, Heliolisk, Goomy, Trevenant, Avalugg, Noivern

Dartrix, Torracat, Brionne, Vikavolt, Crabominable, Ribombee, Lycanroc, Mareanie, Araquanid, Lurantis, Bewear, Comfey, Oranguru, Passimian, Golisopod, Palossand, Minior, Komala, Turtonator, Mimikyu, Drampa, Dhelmise, Jangmo-o

Demanding (75+)

Venusaur, Charizard, Blastoise, Pidgeot, Raichu, Nidoqueen, Nidoking, Poliwrath, Kadabra, Machamp, Slowbro, Haunter, Chansey, Kangaskhan, Starmie, Scyther, Vaporeon, Jolteon, Flareon, Porygon, Omastar, Kabutops, Aerodactyl, Dragonair

Meganium, Typhlosion, Feraligatr, Crobat, Ampharos, Politoed, Espeon, Umbreon, Slowking, Steelix, Pupitar

Slaking, Aggron, Flygon, Cradily, Armaldo, Blaziken, Sceptile, Swampert, Absol, Metang, Shelgon, Gardevoir, Exploud

Torterra, Infernape, Empoleon, Staraptor, Luxray, Rampardos, Bastiodon, Honchkrow, Riolu, Gliscor, Gallade, Gabite, Munchlax, Tangrowth, Lickilicky, Togekiss, Dusknoir, Probopass, Leafeon, Glaceon, Mamoswine, Rotom, Magmortar, Electivire

Serperior, Emboar, Samurott, Unfezant, Gigalith, Conkeldurr, Seismitoad, Scolipede, Krookodile, Carracosta, Archeops, Zoroark, Gothitelle, Reuniclus, Vanilluxe, Ferrothorn, Klinklang, Lampent, Fraxure, Mienshao, Golurk, Bisharp, Braviary, Mandibuzz, Zweilous, Larvesta

Chesnaught, Delphox, Greninja, Talonflame, Florges, Honedge, Dragalge, Clawitzer, Tyrantrum, Aurorus, Sylveon, Sliggoo

Decidueye, Incineroar, Primarina, Toucannon, Toxapex, Mudsdale, Salazzle, Tsareena, Type: Null, Hakumo-o

Merciless (85+)

Alakazam, Gengar, Snorlax, Dragonite

Scizor, Kingdra, Porygon2, Blissey, Tyranitar

Milotic, Salamence, Metagross

Garchomp, Lucario, Rhyperior, Magnezone

Excadrill, Eelektross, Chandelure, Haxorus, Hydreigon

Doublade, Goodra

Silvally, Kommo-o
Stupefying (95+)

Porygon-Z, Volcarona, Aegislash

Legendary???

Yes, you can actually capture a Permanent Legendary Pokemon through art by either submissions or Curating. See this page for more info.


Curator Information

How to Become a Curator

Becoming a Curator is easy! All you have to do is tell us what you think of some pictures and answers a few teeny tiny questions. Well… maybe not that easy. Curators should have a balanced judgement and not bring personal bias into their curations. It’s important to let the artist know what you enjoyed but also tell them what they can improve on for next time. Tips on how to improve, new techniques to try, and different elements to add (say to a background) are all viable suggestions, among others.

Keep in mind that Curators should only be claiming one piece at a time. This is both to be fair to other Curators (nobody likes a hog) and to make sure you can get the work done in a reasonable amount of time.

Scoring Artwork

If you’re even considering becoming a Curator, you should already have a pretty good idea of what sort of scores are appropriate by looking through how our current Curators score the submitted pieces.

It is generally a good idea to consider the rank of the Pokemon attempted when providing a score. Although we do not operate on a purely pass/fail system, the score is still important. For example, a submitted piece depicts Charizard, which would require an 80 or higher, but you don’t think it’s good enough. What about for a Charmander? If so, then the score should fall in the range of 50-80. If you still don’t think it’s good enough, then you should probably score it below 50.

The difficulty of creating the submitted piece is also another important factor when dealing with the CG artforms. For something such as banners, there’s only so much that is genuinely artistic, the rest being a case of correctly layering and arranging stock images. Similarly, a perfectly created sprite can’t be considered on the same scale as a canvas artwork or drawing, and the scores for these “less difficult” art forms should not be as high as others and should not be awarded scores such as 90+.

Critiquing Artwork

Critiquing a piece is where your personal artistic knowledge is important, as there is no standard criteria across all art forms. We expect you to have a thorough understanding of the important aspects of any art form you are evaluating. We understand that you may not have a grasp over every art form. If you don’t feel confident evaluating a particular art form, don’t evaluate it. You may even be told to only evaluate certain art forms when given your Curator License.

For each evaluation, we expect to see accompanying your score a list of reasons that you, personally, came to award that score. In evaluating a drawing, you could discuss any number of factors including colour, line, linestroke, detail, shape, size, lighting, shading, shadows, perspective and many more. There are also key factors that do spread across all art forms, such as ensuring the Pokemon is anatomically correct, the meaning/story depicted is correctly featured or that the piece is correctly signed/proven.

It should go without saying that no-one should be maliciously critical of any artwork. You should be providing constructive criticism. Even the worst MS Paint pieces should be treated with a respectful suggestion that they improve. Curations should include both what you liked and what could be improved on.

Also note that not all advice, techniques, or other suggestions fit a certain piece based on what the artist was going for. Just because it’s a cool method or would drammatically shake the work up does not mean that is what the artist should do. Consider their goals, unity of the entire piece, and what woudl fit thematically too.

Things to Keep in Consideration

Method – Some forms of art require less effort than others. A great banner can take a fraction of the time to make as a great drawing. This should reflect in your score.

Detail – A well drawn picture with an extensive background should score higher than one without. Drawing scales, accentuating fur, and attention to minor details will differ from a plain image without these things. Detail is an indicator of effort. This should reflect in your score.

Creativity – Being creative with your ideas should vastly improve your chances of capture. An ordinary image of the selected Pokemon will not fare the same as one with a story behind it or a theme. An unconventional depiction of the Pokemon makes the picture unique, and not just a reiteration of the anime. It takes more effort to come up with and execute something like this. This should reflect in your score.

The Pokemon – Some are simply easier to draw than others. For instance, a Gyarados would be significantly more of a challenge than something like a Ditto; yet, both are in the same rank of difficulty. This means that the images of easier-made Pokemon should have more content or be held to a stricter standard than the more difficult-made creatures. This should reflect in your score. Also keep in mind that if a piece as multiple Pokemon/focus points in it, the target’s (if capture attempt) importance should be obvious. It should generally be the main focus of the piece.

Curator Payments
Curators are paid roughly every two weeks to month depending on how many or few wages there are. In order to receive these, Curators need to keep a record of their work, located in the Log Thread (BMG | PWN | PXR) in the Art sub-section. If a Curator’s log isn’t updated by the time wages go up, they may not be paid until the next wage period. Curators should be updating their logs after each time they claim new wages.

List any pieces, including a link, that need to be paid. Clearly mark which pieces are paid or unpaid. You can use any format you like as long as this is clear. Many people put past work in a spoiler tag and put unpaid work on top in the open. Some also track total wages or legend tracker, but this is optional (but recommended if interested in a legend, to save counting time later).

Pay is determined by what quality category the curation falls under. Keep in mind that the wage-payer can adjust pay from these categories based on their own judgment. Extra effort will be rewarded while a lack of it will be deducted from. These ranks are just guidelines of what to expect:

Simple – $5,000

These curations are pretty basic. They list a few reasons the curator enjoyed the piece while only highlighting a couple areas of improvement. These are generally helpful for just beginning artists to not overwhelm them or who need a little bit of a guide on some of the basics without going too much in-depth. They may also be more common for mons of a lower rank.

Intermediate – $10,000

This level of curation goes a little further, going more into detail about several areas that could use some improvement with suggestions on how to do so, perhaps offering different techniques or things to try. The main goal here is to reinforce what the artist does well and then help them push the barrier to even higher ranked work. Most curations should probably fall into this range. There should also be some discussion about the piece as a whole and how all the elements work together, not just listing what was done well or not.

Elaborate – $15,000

These curations are rarer and are reserved for special circumstances like an artist’s request or a supremely high quality piece. To fit this type of curation, the review must cover many—as in almost all relevant—aspects of the piece: both what works well and what can be added to. Just summarizing what the artist did and whether you liked it or not will not suffice; you must discuss why it builds on the theme, unity, or other aspects of the piece.

 

*Note: Keep mindful that some artists do not want long, drawn-out advice, even if their piece happens to be very high quality. On the opposite end, too much feedback for something simple may just fluster or dishearten an artist just starting out. Keep feedback balanced and appropriate for skill level, with artist requests always taking priority. We exist to help them improve, after all.

That’s not to say that you shouldn’t try to make a quality feedback post, but bloating a curation just to try to get extra funds will not fly.


Curator Test

This is the Curator Test. Anyone who wishes to become a Curator of the Art section must complete this test. Art knowledge should be your own.

For the visual section, we expect you to evaluate the pieces of art provided. Samples of reasonable evaluations can be found in the Art subsection on individual pieces by other Curators. You should also accompany the evaluation with a scoring and a final verdict.

When it is complete, submit it to an Art Tester. Your suitability will be assessed, and we will let you know what our decision is.

Available Art Testers
WinterVines, EmBreon, K’Sariya

Art Knowledge

Art Section Knowledge

 

Visual Section

Deathkarp by Monbrey

Lugia by Embreon

Night of the Dragon by Frozen Chaos

Frog Monster on Grass by AlaskaPigeon

Untitled by FrozenChaos

Brotherhood by Monbrey

 

Last edited by elysia on 7 August 2017